Crisis Line Advocate – Fulltime

Position Status:           Full-time                     

FLSA:                       non-exempt (hourly)

Supervised by:             Director of Outreach and Legal Services; Director of Finance

GENERAL DESCRIPTION AND PURPOSE:

The overall responsibility of the Crisis Line Advocate is responsible for handling all hotline calls that come into the shelter during business hours. This person will do shelter screenings, legal department referrals, counseling referrals, and any other referrals that are needed for the client on the call.  The Crisis Line Advocate will also ensure accuracy of all crisis line calls and other client data.

QUALIFICATIONS:

The qualifications listed below are representative of the education, experience, skill/ability, and licenses/credentials required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.

 Education

  • Bachelor’s Degree (B.A.) required.

Experience

  • Experience in the field of domestic and/or sexual violence.
  • Any equivalent combination of experience and training which provides the required knowledge, skills, and abilities.

Skills/Abilities

  • Strong oral and written communication skills
  • Strong organizational skills.
  • Ability to maintain accurate data and documentation of client services
  • Ability to resolve conflict
  • Provide and receive supervision
  • Demonstrates effectiveness as a member of a team as well as the ability to work independently
  • Work in basic computer programs such as MS Word & Excel.
  • Bilingual preferred.

Licenses/Credentials

  • N/A

RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Facilitate the daily operation of the crisis line.
  • Attend staff meeting as required.
  • Schedule and train any additional staff for the crisis line.
  • Provide coverage of the crisis line during business hours
  • Check Osnium data for accuracy.
  • Maintain communication with case management team and other shelter staff.
  • Maintenance of client and shelter records:
  • Other duties as determined by the Director of Finance or the Director of Outreach and Legal Services
  • Believe in and act in accordance with the agency’s mission statement and goals
  • Experience working with diverse population and groups.
  • Write routine reports, correspondence and appropriate case notes.

Resume and Cover Letter to Micah Titterington (micah.titterington@familyabusecenter.org)

Christmas Bow

Family Abuse Center’s donors come in all shapes in sizes and are inspired by anything you can imagine. This is the story behind a donation Family Abuse Center received for the babies and infants we serve.

Christie is an instructor at the local YMCA. As a dedicated instructor, Christie shares parts of her life with her class. This year seemed to be about animals. Christie and her husband have always had a heart for animals, particularly donkeys.  For Christmas, Christie was surprised by her husband with a pair of miniature donkeys – Holly and Nick. After coming to live with Christie and her husband, both donkeys began putting on healthy weight, but Holly’s weight seemed to continue increasing. After a trip to the veterinarian, it was determined that Holly was pregnant and might be due in the summer sometime. Each evening, Christie would go to the field and feed Holly and Nick treats and check on them.

In her excitement, Christie talked about Holly every time she instructed her Silver Sneaker’s class at the YMCA. Caught up in all the excitement, the class wanted to have a baby shower and meet the new donkey when he arrives.  Christie has had a heart for Family Abuse Center for a number of years and decided to turn the baby shower into a fundraiser for baby items to bring to the shelter. The plan was made for May 23rd to have the baby shower. Happily, Holly’s baby was born on May 20th, just in time for the party! Because his appearance was such a surprise, the baby was name “Bow” because he was the bow bringing the Christmas surprise together. From the clients and staff at Family Abuse Center, thank you Bow and your family for your inspiration and generosity!

Bow

Back to School!

We have had such an amazing time this summer, but it’s time to start preparing for school again. Please keep in mind Family Abuse Center has students from Pre-Kindergarten all the way through High School. See below for a list of needed items. We greatly appreciate your support!

New/Gently Used uniforms
Index Cards
Graphing paper
Composition Notebooks
Pocket Folders
Backpacks
Pencil Cases
Erasers Quart size
Ziploc style bags
3 Ring Binders
Scissors
Dry Erase Markers
Highlighters
Calculators (all grades)
Pencil Sharpeners
Pencils
Red/Black/Blue Pens
Map colors
Packages of wide-ruled notebook paper
Standard 12” ruler
Hand Sanitizer
Facial Tissues

Strategic networks that empower McLennan County youth

 

When shopping and you come across someone that looks familiar, one automatically stops and tries to figure out where they interacted with that person. If that interaction was positive, they may be prompted to ask where they know the person from or even mull over it before approaching. Curiosity is a normal human reaction to a familiar object, almost like déjà vu, you’ve experienced an encounter with that person or object just can’t put the puzzle pieces together.

If it is understood that curiosity is a natural human desire, why don’t we, as non-profits make an effort to implement initiatives that encourage a certain amount of interactions with prospective clients? There are strategic donation efforts in place that suggest one should interact or “touch” someone in their donorbase before asking for another donation. These “touches” range from personalized letters, biannual newsletters to attending events or even hosting events that potential donors would be interested in attending. Fundraising has been evaluated so extensively that researchers have concluded that seven touches, seven is the amount of times a donor should be touched by you or your organization should interact with the donor before asking for another donation. All of these suggestions are made to encourage relationship building and the “pay it forward attitude,” in the hopes that when one is thinking of nonprofits to contribute time and/or money to, the nonprofit would be at the forefront of the donor’s mind.

Nonprofits should proactively engage the client base as strategically as they seek the donorbase. The donor base may be fewer than the client base but the premise is the same, interact with prospects in a positive and continuous manner that prompts them to inquire about your organization and contribute either time or money.

BOOST is utilizing the fundraising concept and modifying it to connect with McLennan County youth. The reality is that many students do not have steady relationships with authority or leaders in the community. This reality has been the basis of our EMCeeS , Empowering McLennan County Schools, initiative. In the nonprofit community, the leaders are the emcees. Leaders are in control of the mic but we are in place to amplify the needs of the community. EMCeeS are building a network of resources for youth by developing strategic partnerships with organizations in the area, aiming to “touch” certain schools seven times whether it is in a partner organization, volunteering in a school program or presenting at their school. These measures we are implementing are seeking to gauge the McLennan County youth, a strategic play on a natural human desire, curiosity.

BOOST is a leadership development program focused on preventing teen violence. The program’s curriculum integrates preventative measures and leadership then seeks to empower the community by encouraging the ambassador to lead sessions after they complete their leadership development course. We are currently recruiting nine ambassadors for Spring 2016.

Follow BOOST on Facebook @facebook.com/boostwaco.org and Instagram @BOOST_FAC

Blog is written by Netta Mustin, BOOST’s Program Manager